Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Three "Spirit" prizes come to visit ... [giveaway]


Just in time for Christmas and the release of the film, I have three copies of "The Spirit: The Movie Visual Companion," by Mark Cotta Vaz to give away, courtesy of the publisher, Titan Books, and the most excellent Tom Green. The book is definitely worth a look through for fans of Miller, Eisner and the movie — even if the movie itself turns out to not be to everyone's taste. But to get a shot at winning, you'll have to wade through me prattling on about some stuff and then answer a couple questions.

The film seems to be losing the battle of the critics so far, which is both unsurprising and still disappointing. I haven't seen it yet myself, so I'm hoping there's something about it — the tone, or simply embracing its own goofiness, if need be, that makes the experience fun.

I feel more invested in this movie than usual, as I've been writing about it for what seems like forever. I chatted up producer Michael Uslan at a party Oddlot Entertainment threw to announce the pic at Comic-Con in 2006, and managed to ask Miller about adapting Eisner's short stories into a feature film (he said he was working on it). I did a set visit in November 2007 for Newsarama that produced three stories on the film; I did a short interview with producer Deborah Del Prete last summer about shooting in Albuquerque for a Variety special on New Mexico; and, coming up shortly, a piece on the film's visual effects for Animation Magazine. Through that time, I've been impressed by the way the film is being made. The project was put together independently by Oddlot, who shopped it around, saying "this is what we're gonna do, take it or leave it" and got Lionsgate to bite. This was the first feature film to shoot at the booming Albuquerque Studios, a brand new state of the art facility. The set visit was in a lot of ways less impressive, given that all there was to see was a huge greenscreen-draped studio and a few bits of scenery. It was cool to see an old-fashioned delivery truck with the logo "Ditko's Deliveries" stenciled on the side, and to chat briefly with Gabriel Macht in costume. Unfortunately, none of the films' femmes fatale were on set that day.

Beyond that, I've met Miller a number of times. (Some day, I'll have to get my pal Jeff to talk here about the time he asked Miller to make corrections on a piece of original art he owned.) I was most pleased to meet him at a Dark Horse Comic-Con party in 2002, when I handed him a copy of the first Variety comics special I had edited and got a quick pic, taken by DH editor Diana Schutz with my camera. I later learned Miller always does the evil-eye thing in pictures. That night, he excused himself to go say hi to "a good friend," who turned out to be Will Eisner.

Eisner was one of the greats I never had a chance to really meet. My favorite Eisner story was in "Invisible People," the episode in which an obit run by mistake destroys a meek man's life while the newspaper editor refused to admit the mistake and eventually won an award for her error-free track record. I was asked to be a judge for the Eisner Awards in September 2004 (the same day I had gone to press event for the DVD release of the original Star Wars trilogy and got to meet Mark Hamill and irvin Kershner — it was a good day). I had been looking forward to the opportunity to meet Eisner and perhaps talk with him a bit more. But it was not to be, as will died at the New Year, several months even before the judging. I don't recall any of the judges discussing Eisner much in the room, but when the ceremony came around and Will wasn't there, it was definitely a very sad moment.

Eisner and Miller's relationship is also interesting, and I am quite looking forward to finding the time to reread "Eisner/Miller" after seeing the movie to see if the impression that these men were in tune with each other's sensibilities was real or just an impression made larger than it really was by the very nice idea that these two creators from different generations could have the kind of collegial relationship they seemed to enjoy.

So, on to the giveaway: The first three people to answer the following three questions correctly in the comments section of this post will win a copy of the book. Be sure to use an email address I can use to contact you with when you make your post. I have to limit the contest to domestic entries, i.e., I will not ship overseas. I will contact the winners via email to get shipping info, etc. Got it? Go:

1. What year were the Eisner Awards first given out?

2. Who conducted the interviews in the 2005 book "Eisner/Miller"? (Bonus points if you can tell me what worthy comics org he works for.)

3. Which of his famous characters did Miller freely admit to copying almost directly from Eisner's Sand Saref?

Good luck!

6 comments:

Jim McClain said...

#1 1988

#2 Charles Brownstein

#3 Elektra

ofmasksandmen@comcast.net

Jim McClain said...

Oh, and Brownstein works for the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

aaron said...

it feels cheap answering the questions when the answers are already there... but i swear i knew them Or looked up the ones i didn't know)!
1) 1988 (i actually did a comic years ago with this fact in it: http://chainsawcomics.com/comics/1 )
2: charles brownsteing on the cbldf
3: elektra

abrassea(at)gmail(dot)com

parkerlbennett said...

I 1988
2 Charles Brownstein on the cbldf
3 Elektra

But the answers are right above!

Parker Bennett said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tom McLean said...

Parker:

I've emailed you twice, so I guess it's not going through. You need to email me your mailing address to tjmclean(at)earthlink(dot)com

Thanks.